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Ex-Kenyan President Arap Moi Breathes His Last

By Keefa Nuwahereza

Daniel Arap Moi Nyayo, the former president of Kenya is no more, after has breathed his last  at Nairobi Hospital on Monday night, aged 95 years old.

Moi’s death was announced on Tuesday morning by President Uhuru Kenyatta, who sent his condolences to the family. 
Moi has been in and out of hospital in the past years according to family members, battling a longtime bout of cancer.
It should be recalled that Moi became president as a result of the death of then president Mzee Jomo Kenyatta in 1978.
Through popular agitation and external pressures, he was forced to allow multiparty elections in 1991; he led his party, KANU, to victory in the 1992 and 1997 elections. Prior to becoming President, he served as the third Vice President of Kenya from 1967 to 1978.

Moi is popularly known to Kenyans as Nyayo, a Swahili word for “footsteps”, as he often said he was following in the footsteps of the first President, Jomo Kenyatta.
He also earned the sobriquet “Professor of Politics” due to his long rule of 24 years, the longest in Kenyan history to date.
At 95, he was currently the oldest living former Kenyan president.

However, he was seen by his critics as an authoritarian ruler who held on to power for 24 years, but his allies credited him for maintaining stability in the East African state.

Moi stepped down in 2002 after being constitutionally barred from running for a further term.

In office, he was feared and admired in equal measure, and was accused of human rights abuses. Moi introduced multi-party politics in 1991, but subsequent elections were marred by rigging.

He was seen by his critics as an authoritarian ruler who held on to power for 24 years, but his allies credited him for maintaining stability in the East African state.

Moi stepped down in 2002 after being constitutionally barred from running for a further term.

He was the country’s second president taking over after the death of Jomo Kenyatta in 1978.

In office, he was feared and admired in equal measure, and was accused of human rights abuses. Moi introduced multi-party politics in 1991, but subsequent elections were marred by rigging.

He was elected for a further two terms in 1992 and 1997 in polls that were widely regarded as rigged.

While president, he appeared to dominate almost every aspect of life, an impression aided by the state-run media.

His critics see his rule as the lost years, a time when Kenya was bedevilled by corruption, ethnic conflicts and human rights abuses.

They say he stymied economic progress by personalising the state, using government resources to award loyalists and withholding them to punish those who did not toe the line.

For example, roads and factories were seen as gifts to be given and rewards for communities if their top politicians worked with the ruling party, Kanu. This entrenched a culture of political patronage that has become part of Kenyan politics.

But defenders of Moi’s legacy point to his often-repeated line that he kept Kenya “peaceful”, while several African countries were experiencing strife.

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MEGA MILK

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